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California Governor Brown names Stanford Law School’s William B. Gould IV to lead Agricultural Labor Relations Board

Stanford Law School Professor William B. Gould IV

Stanford Law School Professor William B. Gould IV

Stanford, Calif., February 20, 2014 – California Governor Jerry Brown has appointed William B. Gould IV as a member and Chair of the state’s Agricultural Labor Relations Board, the Governor’s Office announced this week. The appointment is effective as of March 18, 2014. Gould is the Charles A. Beardsley Professor of Law, Emeritus, at Stanford Law School.

Gould praised the Agricultural Labor Relations Act as one of Governor Brown’s early achievements. He also observed that the Act, much like the National Labor Relations Act, promotes the collective bargaining process and workers’ freedom of association.

“I welcome the challenge of the Governor’s appointment,” Gould said. “In the coming weeks and months, I look forward to meeting other Board members, the General Counsel, ALRB staff throughout our state, stakeholders and elected officials, and members of the public. I shall do the best that I can to give back to California, which has given so much to my family and to me.”

A prolific scholar of labor and discrimination law, Gould has been a highly influential voice on worker-management relations for more than 40 years. Before arriving at Stanford Law School in 1972, Gould was an attorney for the National Labor Relations Board and the United Auto Workers. He served as Chairman of the National Labor Relations Board from 1994 to 1998.

Gould has been a member of the National Academy of Arbitrators since 1970 and has arbitrated and mediated more than 200 labor disputes, including the 1992 and 1993 salary disputes between the Major League Baseball Players Association and the Major League Baseball Player Relations Committee. He has also acted as Special Advisor to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and as Independent Monitor for FirstGroup America. In addition, Gould has received five honorary doctorates for his contributions to the fields of labor law and labor relations.

Gould is a critically acclaimed author of 10 books and more than 60 law review articles. His work includes a historical record of the experiences of his great-grandfather in Diary of a Contraband: The Civil War Passage of a Black Sailor, and his own story, Labored Relations: Law, Politics and the NLRB: A Memoir. Gould’s most recent book is Bargaining with Baseball: Labor Relations in an Age of Prosperous Turmoil.

About Stanford Law School Stanford Law School (www.law.stanford.edu) is one of the nation’s leading institutions for legal scholarship and education. Its alumni are among the most influential decision makers in law, politics, business, and high technology. Faculty members argue before the Supreme Court, testify before Congress, produce outstanding legal scholarship and empirical analysis, and contribute regularly to the nation’s press as legal and policy experts. Stanford Law School has established a new model for legal education that provides rigorous interdisciplinary training, hands-on experience, global perspective, and focus on public service, spearheading a movement for change.

Celebrated human rights practitioner Seife Ayalew Asfaw receives first Rubin Family International Human Rights Award from Stanford Law School

Human rights activist and inaugural Rubin Family International Human Rights Award recipient Seife Ayalew Asfaw (courtesy of Seife Ayalew Asfaw)

Human rights practitioner and inaugural Rubin Family International Human Rights Award recipient Seife Ayalew Asfaw (courtesy of Seife Ayalew Asfaw)

practitioner

Stanford, Calif., February 18, 2014 – Stanford Law School has selected prominent Ethiopian human rights practitioner Seife Ayalew Asfaw as the inaugural recipient of its Rubin Family International Human Rights Award. The new award recognizes young leaders in the international social justice movement by bringing one such individual to Stanford Law School as a practitioner-in-residence for two weeks every year.

Asfaw will be at Stanford from April 8th to April 17th. He will collaborate with thought leaders and connect with program resources throughout Stanford Law School and Stanford University, as well as share strategies with social justice leaders in the Bay Area.

Asfaw leads a network of legal aid centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital. His primary responsibilities include daily assessment and monitoring of the activity of legal aid centers in Addis Ababa, mentoring and supervising legal aid service providers and paralegals, conducting human rights training and building relationships with donors and collaborative partners.

Faced with a challenging operating environment, Asfaw works within the framework of Ethiopian law to advance human rights, specifically by expanding citizens’ knowledge of and access to legal services. Asfaw will use his time at Stanford Law School to study how public interest legal organizations in the United States combine legal services and impact litigation. He intends to establish an Impact Litigation Project in partnership with private law offices, NGOs and law schools when he returns to Ethiopia. The Project will allow Asfaw to challenge Ethiopian laws and practices that discriminate against women and children, limit freedoms of association and religion, and impair the economic rights of poor and vulnerable people.

The Rubin Family International Human Rights Award is designed to enhance the practitioner-in-residence’s capacity to influence policies, practices and laws that promote systems-changing responses to significant human rights problems. By uniting legal education with a spirit of application to the world’s most pressing human rights crises, this award will also create opportunities for Stanford Law students to participate in globalized citizenship and advance a focus on the realization of human rights.

About Stanford Law School Stanford Law School (www.law.stanford.edu) is one of the nation’s leading institutions for legal scholarship and education. Its alumni are among the most influential decision makers in law, politics, business, and high technology. Faculty members argue before the Supreme Court, testify before Congress, produce outstanding legal scholarship and empirical analysis, and contribute regularly to the nation’s press as legal and policy experts. Stanford Law School has established a new model for legal education that provides rigorous interdisciplinary training, hands-on experience, global perspective, and focus on public service, spearheading a movement for change.

This post was revised on February 20, 2014.

Stanford Law School’s David Hayes, students formulating recommendations to help Obama Administration stop wildlife trafficking

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SLS Distinguished Visiting Lecturer David J. Hayes speaks at public meeting of President's Advisory Council on Wildlife Trafficking

SLS Distinguished Visiting Lecturer David J. Hayes speaks at public meeting of President’s Advisory Council on Wildlife Trafficking

Stanford, Calif., February 11, 2014 – President Obama took a major step today in his continuing initiative to combat the ongoing massive killing of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife, which is decimating populations of these iconic creatures. Acting under the Executive Order that he signed last July in Tanzania, the President today released a National Strategy to address this threat to economic and national security. In his capacity as Vice Chair of the President’s Advisory Council, which was established under the President’s Executive Order, David J. Hayes—Visiting Distinguished Lecturer in Law at Stanford Law School—provided input into the National Strategy that was released today. Hayes is currently working with students at Stanford Law School and with other Stanford University graduate students to develop recommendations for the Council by the end of March to help implement the new National Strategy.

Hayes, who drew attention to this issue while serving as the Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Interior, is continuing to focus on the international wildlife trafficking crisis. In fact, Hayes recently wrote an op-ed in The Los Angeles Times about this subject.

Armed gangs, organized by sophisticated criminal syndicates, slaughtered more than 30,000 elephants and 1,000 rhinos in Africa last year alone, fueling a billion-dollar illegal black market that is corrupting governments and funding terrorist organizations.

“The President’s National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking lays out a comprehensive plan to stop the killings that are destabilizing governments, financing terrorists and threatening the existence of some of the world’s most iconic wildlife species,” Hayes commented. “At current rates of killing, African elephants and rhinos could disappear from the wild within 10 years.”

SLS second-year student Laura Sullivan and Stanford graduate student Alexandra Broner testify before Advisory Council

SLS second-year student Laura Sullivan and Stanford graduate student Alexandra Broner testify before Advisory Council

Hayes noted that one of the most important deliverables under the National Strategy is a commitment to close legal loopholes and ban the sale of ivory products in the U.S.

“Consumers need a clear signal that ivory trade is unacceptable,” Hayes said. “My hope is that U.S. leadership on this issue will persuade other nations to also take steps to shut down all ivory trading.”

Hayes also commended the Administration in calling for a public/private partnership to raise awareness of the killings and reduce the burgeoning consumer demand for ivory products and rhino horn.

“We need the cooperation of leading companies from the airline, shipping, tourist, Internet and retail industries to help end wildlife trafficking. The private sector has a key role to play in drawing attention to the crisis and in helping to ensure that it is not unwittingly aiding in the illegal trafficking of wildlife products,” Hayes remarked.

SLS second-year student Laura Sullivan and Stanford graduate student Alexandra Broner testify before Advisory Council

SLS second-year student Laura Sullivan and Stanford graduate student Alexandra Broner testify before Advisory Council

Hayes served as Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior from 2009 until 2013, where he was Chief Operating Officer and second-in-command to the Interior Secretary. He is currently teaching a course at Stanford Law School entitled “Wildlife Trafficking: Ending the Scourge.”

**Follow @djhayes01 on Twitter.**

* This post was updated on March 21, 2014, to include additional resources.

About Stanford Law School Stanford Law School (www.law.stanford.edu) is one of the nation’s leading institutions for legal scholarship and education. Its alumni are among the most influential decision makers in law, politics, business, and high technology. Faculty members argue before the Supreme Court, testify before Congress, produce outstanding legal scholarship and empirical analysis, and contribute regularly to the nation’s press as legal and policy experts. Stanford Law School has established a new model for legal education that provides rigorous interdisciplinary training, hands-on experience, global perspective, and focus on public service, spearheading a movement for change.

Leading national legal research institute honors Stanford Law’s Deborah Rhode with Outstanding Scholar Award

Stanford Law School Professor Deborah L. Rhode

Stanford Law School Professor Deborah L. Rhode

Stanford, Calif., February 10, 2014 – Stanford Law School’s Deborah L. Rhode accepted the Outstanding Scholar Award from The Fellows of the American Bar Foundation at a weekend ceremony in Chicago, Ill. The American Bar Foundation announced the award in a January 27th press release. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, Director of the Center on the Legal Profession and Director of the Program in Law and Social Entrepreneurship at Stanford Law School.

“Throughout her distinguished career, Professor Rhode has become a highly lauded and frequently cited scholar on legal ethics,” said Don Slesnick, Chair of The Fellows of the American Bar Foundation. “From her groundbreaking work on access to justice to her unique contributions to research on gender and the law, Rhode’s prolific career exemplifies the type of outstanding scholarship that The Fellows of the American Bar Foundation seeks to recognize through the Outstanding Scholar Award.”

Rhode’s interest in legal ethics and access to justice began very early in her legal career.

During law school, Rhode worked for a legal services office that wanted to create a kit to help low-income people represent themselves in legal matters. With relatively few legal resources available to the poor at the time, the kits could have significantly improved access to justice for those who needed it most. The local bar association, however, frowned upon the effort and threatened to sue, arguing that the kits represented the unauthorized practice of law. Consequently, the office chose to shelve the project.

These developments “struck me as just wrong on so many levels,” Rhode says.

Believing that the bar association erred in doctrine and in policy—and sensitive to the group’s economic self-interest in clamping down on the kits—Rhode researched the matter further. She found that when another organization made similar kits available to the public, kit-users made about the same number of mistakes as those who had attorneys representing them.

This work, which was published in the Yale Law Journal, “convinced me both to become an academic and to write about issues of legal ethics, and particularly those related to access to justice,” Rhode explains.

For Rhode, legal ethics and access to justice are inextricably intertwined.

“What passes for justice among the have-nots is scandalous,” Rhode declares, adding that access to justice is “an integral part of legal ethics instruction.”

And she is aware of the critique that ethics cannot be taught: “There is definitely a view that either students have it or they don’t.”

But as Rhode clarifies, empirical legal research suggests that young adults’ strategies for dealing with ethical challenges are malleable. Rhode’s own approach to teaching legal ethics involves a combination of well-taught simulations, real-life problems and case histories. Additionally, Rhode prefers to spend more time on ethical questions that implicate conflicting values and true dilemmas rather than on questions with easy answers.

Rhode is the founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, the former chair of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession, the former founding director of Stanford’s Center on Ethics and the former director of Stanford’s Institute for Research on Women and Gender.

Rhode has also won numerous awards, including the American Bar Association’s Michael Franck Award for contributions to the field of professional responsibility, the American Bar Foundation’s W.M. Keck Foundation Award for distinguished scholarship on legal ethics, the American Bar Association’s Pro Bono Publico Award for her work on expanding public service opportunities in law schools and the White House’s Champion of Change award for a lifetime’s work in increasing access to justice.

A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and Vice-Chair of the Board of Legal Momentum, Rhode is a highly accomplished scholar. She has authored or coauthored more than 20 books and 250 articles. Rhode is also a columnist for the National Law Journal and has published editorials in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and Slate. Her recent publications include The Beauty Bias, Woman and Leadership, Legal Ethics, Gender and Law, Moral Leadership and Access to Justice.

About Stanford Law School Stanford Law School (www.law.stanford.edu) is one of the nation’s leading institutions for legal scholarship and education. Its alumni are among the most influential decision makers in law, politics, business, and high technology. Faculty members argue before the Supreme Court, testify before Congress, produce outstanding legal scholarship and empirical analysis, and contribute regularly to the nation’s press as legal and policy experts. Stanford Law School has established a new model for legal education that provides rigorous interdisciplinary training, hands-on experience, global perspective, and focus on public service, spearheading a movement for change.

Prominent civil rights advocate helps Stanford Law School honor 50 years of Civil Rights Act, warns about continuing structural discrimination

Eva Jefferson Paterson delivering the keynote address at "The Civil Rights Act at 50."

Eva Jefferson Paterson delivering the keynote address at “The Civil Rights Act at 50.”

Stanford, Calif., February 3, 2014 – America is not yet a post-racial society and Americans must “look at the notion and the existence and vitality of structural racism” in order to move forward, suggested Eva Jefferson Paterson, President and Co-Founder of the Equal Justice Society, at a recent symposium at Stanford Law School celebrating the history and legacy of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Paterson, an attorney with a distinguished record of championing civil rights, gave the keynote address at the symposium entitled “The Civil Rights Act at 50.”

Welcoming Paterson to the stage, Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and Dean of Stanford Law School M. Elizabeth Magill hailed Paterson’s decades of leadership and many accomplishments in tackling barriers to equality. Magill observed that the symposium provided an opportunity to reflect “about where we’ve been, where we are and where we’re going” fifty years after the passage of “perhaps one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century.” Magill added that Paterson’s keynote address would be especially helpful in that reflection.

Paterson’s work on civil rights litigation and policy began in the 1970s. She served in a broad coalition that successfully challenged discriminatory practices in the San Francisco Fire Department and has been a leading spokesperson for statewide campaigns against the death penalty, juvenile incarceration and discrimination against members of the LGBT community. As a 20-year-old student leader, she debated Vice President Spiro Agnew on live television.

This experience allowed her to “think about a lot of ideas and connect the dots” in preparing her keynote remarks, Paterson said.

Paterson spoke of the history of violence, indignity and terror that permeated the United States before the Civil Rights Act and commended the courage of those who suffered in that climate. She noted that the violence and terror peaked during a relentless series of major events in 1963, including sit-ins and marches in Birmingham, Ala., the bombing of a Birmingham church that killed four children, the persistent refusal of Alabama Governor George Wallace to allow school desegregation, and the assassinations of civil rights activist Medgar Evers and President John F. Kennedy, who had called for federal civil rights legislation.

According to Paterson, these events helped propel the ultimate passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: “Americans, in their living rooms, saw the viciousness” of racial discrimination and its consequences.

During her address, Paterson also encouraged students to engage with their surroundings and push back against prejudicial ideas. She noted that a Stanford Law education is a serious credential and would position SLS students to be leaders in resisting discrimination.

“If you just let this stuff slide, in this environment, that’s not good,” Paterson cautioned.

And though she expressed concerns about efforts to weaken the Civil Rights Act, Paterson still affirmed the “forward momentum of the law” and encouraged its expansion to cover additional categories, such as age and disability. Paterson also warned the audience about negative depictions in popular culture of people of color, women and members of the LGBT community and discussed how cognition can fuel discrimination because people act upon unconscious biases.

Finally, she pressed Stanford Law students to pursue work that helps fight discrimination with their unique skillset, including litigation, scholarship, and becoming public intellectuals.

“Students, use your careers for good,” Paterson urged.

“The Civil Rights Act at 50” featured two dozen scholars and practitioners, including several members of Stanford Law School’s faculty. The symposium was co-sponsored by the Stanford Law Review and the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

About Stanford Law School Stanford Law School (www.law.stanford.edu) is one of the nation’s leading institutions for legal scholarship and education. Its alumni are among the most influential decision makers in law, politics, business, and high technology. Faculty members argue before the Supreme Court, testify before Congress, produce outstanding legal scholarship and empirical analysis, and contribute regularly to the nation’s press as legal and policy experts. Stanford Law School has established a new model for legal education that provides rigorous interdisciplinary training, hands-on experience, global perspective, and focus on public service, spearheading a movement for change.